Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Wagons Roll!

"Wagon" - Irish slang. A difficult, awkward or cantankerous woman.


The first time I ever head the expression ‘wagon’ was from a relation of mine speaking about one of her in-laws. I thought it had a quare ring to it but wasn’t sure enough of its meaning to use it myself. It seemed to be some form of derogatory term used to describe other women and, as such, would not be a very appropriate word for the likes of a well-reared, educated and kind woman such as myself.


But that is enough lies for one evening. I was reading the Swearing Lady the other day and came across the word ‘wagon’ again and I thought to myself that I’d need to get a handle on this expression so that I can slip it into conversation. For I have known many wagons in my time. I even live with one. And poor Bert, he has two oul wagons to contend with. The man is a blessed saint that he hasn’t us both poisoned.

4 comments:

sageweb said...

I love that term. First I have ever heard of it though..I wonder how it got started...
It sorta make me wonder...considering when someone stops drinking they say they are on the wagon.

Beowulf said...

'Wagon' is a common word for a woman in my neck of the woods, but it means pretty much the opposite to us. A 'wagon' is, as the kids would say, a 'hottie'.

Megan Fox is a wagon, for example.

Nelly said...

Sageweb - I've wondered if its meaning comes from the Gaelic? Any Irish speakers help?

Beowulf - According to wiktionary the term can also mean an immoral or loose woman. So perhaps that is where the County Down meaning derives from.

Cian said...

The general consensus on slang.ie is that Wagon is indeed a cantankerous old so and so...

In Waterford City a bibe would be the literal translation :-)